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. that is we had a very tough election, in which fundamental issues were debated, the rights of gay and lesbian people, the right to vote because of the assault on the fundamental right to vote that took place in so many states, climate change, a continuation of our commitment to think medicare and social security and the noes thtion th inequality is not a necessary component of the economy. and we want to believe all of those issues. and i think what the president was saying, was, look, we have elections. and when you have a full debate in an election and the outcome is pretty clear cut, then it's his obligation and his right to move forward on all of those issues. >> and as we are watching the navajo nation just went by, their float, one of the things i saw today, melissa, is the whole changing of the demographics of america was reflected at the inauguration, as we look at native americans float goes by, as we heard a president for the first time refer in an inaugural address to same-sex marriage and to gay rights and talking about gender rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bib
to help elect pro-choice women across this country. i am so proud to be one of nine emily's list women reelected in 2012 to the u.s. senate's and one of 20 women sworn in earlier this month, the most ever in our nation's history. no one runs for senate alone. no one runs for senate alone and wins. i was never alone, not for a singesingle minute. you were with me every single step of the day. back in may 2011 when the senator announced that he was retiring, i convened a conference call to figure out whether there was a way i could step up and run. just like you have been with me for so long, emily's list was there for me at that moment. you were there day one when i ran for the house of representatives bac in 1998. the pungent scent i cannot win. you read there with me. -- you were there with me every step of the way. i became the first woman to represents a woman in the house o. and on the first day of this long journey you were there for me with sage advice, plenty of encouragement and a commitment to stand with me every single day. you follow it through and then some. thousands of yo
not expect to witness an election won by overinflate. some will look longingly on the time when one candidate dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenge
to the election if they declare that he dies tomorrow which there is a rumor that they would do that actually going around now, that if he would be declared dead and they called an election within 30 days and the opposition won, meaning the sympathy vote for the candidate which is difficult after what we saw on december 16th and dhaka election we just talked about, chavez has 20 of 23 governors. 11 of the governors that were run by the chavez party are former military officials, including four ministers of defense, who are now governors of their respective states. several of them are all along the office of the control campaign list because of their work with the farc so we have a situation where people are in control of things, so that even if henry embrey de four e elected president in this election it's the opposite -- he's the head of the opposition who ran against chavez and got a 45% to 55% but we are talking about to the even if he was to win, he still would have institutions that are controlled by the chavez government including the supreme court which we just pointed out, including t
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immigration reform, bank regulations, and so on down
this election, gave him the confidence to say the election delivered a mandate for my vision of government, my vision of politics, one that involves gay rights, immigration, climate change, an issue that he hasn't really spoken of since his attempts to deal with it in 2009, fell short. so this was really a different president coming out, using the election as a turning point for his agenda and really making clear that that cautious pragmatist of the last four years, that often came out, is going to give way to someone who is unabashedly starting negotiations from a more progressive liberal standpoint than he was willing to do in the recent past. >> not surprisingly, there's been some push-back already. darrell issa said quote, i'm hoping the president will recognize that compromise should have been the words for today and they clearly weren't. john mccain said i would have liked to see a little more on outreach and working together. there was not, as i have seen in other inaugural speeches. i want to work with my colleagues. and i'm wondering what you think about this approach and i think that
the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first president since dwight eisenhower to win two consecutive elections with more than 51% of the popular vote. he won for the 372 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206 and spent part of the morning at the white house having coffee with bipartisan leadership. >> this is the second time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families a
. in this conversation we have the rear picture -- rare picture of king advising johnson how he's going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here we go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't. because i'm going to keep on talking. at any rate a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movement and people in congress tried to put an end, finally, for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmund pet tiss bridge -- pettis bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenants started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpack -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of sherr ri
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
of the world in this election in whh he did well with minorities and younger voters and so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so too hopes his second term will speak to that. >> rose: we conclude this evening with part one of a two-part conversation about the presidency of barack obama and the next four years joined by doris kearns goodwin, jon meacham, bob woodward, bob caro, and michael beschloss. >> i know it's the consensus that we're -- barack obama has to do is get along with the republicans. i'd like to say something about that. president obama is fond of quoting-- and if he isn't, i am-- martin luther king's statement "the moral arc of the universe bends slowly but it bends towards justice." in the first term, president obama did bend that moral arc. he got health insurance, peace of mind for more than 30 million people. the bill may be floored but it's passed. in the second term i see a sort of differently. everyone's attacking the moral arc of justice-- social security medicare everyone's saying we have
. it was relatively easy it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to do was notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legislators. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine ex
governors after the election went to johnson and said, please stop sending this stuff to congress making us look too liberal to get re-elected. >> all right. michael, thank you very much. >> thanks. great to see you all, guys. >> all right. >>> next, what if anything can manti te'o learn when and if he finally comes clean from lance armstrong's confession, aka, how to not be a complete and utter loser? lance is next in the spin as we roll on. it's friday, january 18th. i didn't think it was anything. i had pain in my abdomen... it just wouldn't go away. i was spotting, but i had already gone through menopause. these symptoms may be nothing... but they could be early warning signs of a gynecologic cancer, such as cervical, ovarian, or uterine cancer. feeling bloated for no reason. that's what i remember. seeing my doctor probably saved my life. warning signs are not the same for everyone. if you think something's wrong... see your doctor. ask about gynecologic cancer. and get the inside knowledge. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was jus
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
of the world in this election in which he did well with minorities and younger voters so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so, too, hopes his second term will speak to that. and i think that was an interesting part of this speech but if you're in a republican hearing this when he talks about collective action they hear big government, when he talks about investment they hear taxes and when he talks about takers which he did in the speech, that's a loaded word. it aims right at paul ryan who talked about takers versus makers, the takers being the one who receive federal benefits but pay no federal income tax. that's a shot. that's not just language that's slipped in. so that's the sense in which this had a combative -- there were a few barbs in this speech. >> one of the moments in the campaign when the president was office balance was when he said you didn't build it, talking about small business. that was one of the big themes of the speech saying you need collective action in order to get anything done. again, not ne
and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will be reintroduced after all of those changes take effect and hopefully we'll have garnered some support and move forward, so we'll keep sounding that drum beat but tlt be on pause until after january when the new add m*ins -- administrations get all in place, so the problem, this can be really overwhelming, especially if you have not spent a lot of time thinking about this, but i think one of the solutions is just to start with one thing at a time and pick something that resonates for you, whether it's your food or you have kids and you just want to focus on making sure that -- what they're using and taking in is safer, or if it's an area of your life with regard -- we'll talk about this somehow with the fire department or your fire stations or your fire houses or whatever, also reach out to the breast cancer funds, we love q
policies. it's amazing to me. aren't we electing people to protect american people? >> yeah. if they can't pass this, i mean, what can they do? if they can't do this thing that has never ever been controversial. and the other thing that's really disturbing is everything now. the fiscal cliff, the debt ceiling, the continuing budget resolution. everything is used as a bargaining chip to get their way in this very ideological way. you said you don't doubt the congressman's sincerity on deficit reduction. i do. when you look at the fact that he didn't vote for the fiscal cliff deal. if you're talking about deficit reduction from raising revenues, he's not on board at all. he only wants to see it come from cuts. so it's a specific piece of ideology that he is coming from. i think it's abhorrent to use something like disaster relief as a chip to get your way. >> richard, they're also threatening government shutdown. are there any boundaries to some -- and these are not all republicans, but these extreme republicans when it comes to their ideology no matter who it hurts? >> they blinked last t
elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our chief washington correspondent and anchor of ""face the nation."" bob, what
the election against the incumbent, and at issue was the iran contra crisis, where americans were held for over 400 days after a group of islamic militants and students took over the embassy. as he was giving his inauguration address, the militants were being released. this is about 25 minutes. [applause] >> governor, are you prepared to take the constitutional oath? >> i am. >> raise your right hand and repeat after me. i, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will come to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. t
. much of the polarization is not eternal, it is external because of the people who get elected -- internal, it is external because of the people who get elected. >> when our nation separated from church and state. what are your thoughts and using the bible, and the words "so help me god" used? >> not only did george bible, but have a after his inauguration, the congress voted to have a church service. it went across to sit paul's chapel in new york board -- they went across to st. paul's chapel in new york, and had a service. there was no first amendment by the at that time. -- at that time. what has happened now is that congress does not vote in these things. presidents choose what to do. since roosevelt's time, presidents have usually gone to a church service on the morning of the inauguration or just before the inauguration. that is personal to them. they choose whatever bible to hold. just like members of congress can choose a family bible or historical bible. when the first muslim was sworn in, he was provided with thomas jefferson's copy of the koran to be sworn in. peopl
in the sand and we would get pounded. sure enough it fell after the election and we did get pumme d pummeled. but most impressed me was what she told us on november 20th. when everyone was ready to freak out at that moment, at that chicken little moment, when all the worry warts were out in full force she told us to stop worrying. she sent me this, holy cow, this is out of sink with what we were thinking. at the time. the s&p is at 1387. now it is at 1492. in short, brodin nailed a 100 point move. in two months what a great grab. look at that. she nailed that. i might be a charrist, but the charts don't have emotions. they aren't about the fiscal cliff. it is totally working this market. so i have to go back to the well. what can i tell you, we want to know what the queen thinks it could go next. take a look at this chart. the s&p said it would. and totally there after. she told us that the low was likely to be pivotal. as a key part of her methodology. these numbers are 23.6%. 38.2%. and 69.1%. it is erie and according to many technicians it is a crucial inte turning point and you apply the
is not the interim appointee, it's the election of a new senator in the special election. that's what we need to focus on. >> schieffer: i take it will be a democrat? >> it will be a democrat. the. >> pelley: governor patrick, thank you for joining us. we have in the capitol rotunda a very special guest today, valerie jarrett, senior advisor to the president and i day air is the person in washington who has known the president and first lady longest, being a long-time friend of both in chicago. ms. jarrett, great of you to be with us, thank you so much. >> it's a pleasure. it's a pleasure to be here. it's a terrific day for america. is. >> pelley: i have to believe that you were involved in the president's speech today. he must have run it by you. he runs nearly everything by you. >> (laughs) >> pelley: and i wonder. >> what do you any the president wanted us to take from that speech? one thing that was the take-home message? >> well, i think part of what he wanted to do today is to lay out the vision of our founding fathers as basic values of principals that guide us and so what i heard when
better, make an issue with their elected officials. i have some policy recommendations at the end of the. i hope people will look at this recent. >> the former head of the fdic, sheila bair on the government's role during the country's worst financial crisis since the depression. her book is "bull by the horns." sunday night at eight on c-span's q&a. >> next comic kansas governor sam brownback delivers his third state of the state address. in his remarks before the joint session of the house and senate, he gave his plans for balancing the state budget which faces a projected shortfall of $267 million for the fiscal year beginning july 1. this event in topeka is 25 minutes. >> good evening. mr. speaker, madam president, -- [applause] you jumped my laundry now going to have to repeat. you will have to do that again, i hope. i was just looking at her thinking there's a lot of new faces here. welcome. good to have you in the legislature. it's going to be a great you and they do have before i get started one quick big announcement. next year at this time the capital renovation will be complet
got elected. certainly there was a list of something like 67 members and asked for and voted for and demanded the rein their states for natural disasters hit in the midwest and the gulf coast and so forth and refused to vote for it now. no rational answer to that. i like to believe it's not because they are prejudice against new york or the northeast. it's hard to reach such say conclusion. >> thank you so much for joining us. >> you're welcome. >> earlier in the show we showed you a portion of the controversial ad focusing on the president's daughters. it's also generating a ton of talk on the facebook page right now. tommy mars et said i hope the good members who are members of the lobby will not renew. nra equals nothing reasonable allowed. let us know what you are thinking. up next, sorry, texas. we are messing with texas. how about a few other eyebrow raisers sparked a change at the white house. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you be
to grow this economy and put people back to work. and despite that conversation, and despite the election results, the position that's been taken on the part of some house republicans is that, "no, we've got to do it our way, and if we don't, we simply won't pay america's bills." well, that can't be a position that is sustainable over time. it's not one that's good for the economy now. bes certainly not going to the kind of precedent that i want to establish not just for my presidency, but for future presidents, even if it was on the other side. democrats don't like voting for the debt ceiling when a republican is president, and yet you -- but you never saw a situation in which democrats suggested somehow that we would go ahead and default if we didn't get 100 percent of our way. that's just not how it's supposed to work. jon karl. >> thank you, mr. president. on the issue of guns, given how difficult it will be -- some would say impossible -- to get any gun control measure passed through this congress, what are you willing or able to do, using the powers of your presidency, to act withou
backlash against democratic members of congress who voted for that in the 1994 midterm elections. what the white house believes may be different this time, not just newtown, but this whole series of tragedies like tucson, aurora, colorado, and newtown having some children killed, they think the political dynamic has changed. we shall see, jenna. jenna: we will see if it sets the tone for the second term of the president which is about to officially begin. back to the white house as news develops. thanks very much. jon: before bringing his proposals to the president the vice president met with representativesing from the entertainment and videogame industry and other lawmakers attacked hollywood over increasing violence portrayed. so what will the president do? will there be any pushes for changes in the videogame and entertainment industries? chief washington correspondent james rosen live in our d.c. bureau with more on that. do we know yet, whether the obama-biden proposals, james, contain anything as far as hollywood and the gaming industry are concerned? >> reporter: we don't, jon.
not fear the national rifle association. the nra didn't affect any races in the last election cycle and it probably won't do it the next time around. now, if senate democrats cannot get over the hump of losing their a rating from the national rifle association, folks, this gun legislation, it isn't going to go anywhere. senator al flank efranken of mi is another democratic lawmaker who was somewhat puzzling in the last 24 hours who decided to clarify his position. he says, "i co-sponsored legislation to ban large clips like those used in so many mass shootings," he said in a statement. "i also support the principle that we should reinstate a ban on assault weapons. and i will carefully review any proposal to do that." in principle. can we get some straight talk? because that in principle kind of thing leaves a little wiggle room that maybe you might not do it, al. there are other senate democrats ready to vote right now. there are multiple democrats sponsoring their own legislation. a background check bill from senator chuck schumer. an assault weapons ban from senator dianne feinst
interesting thing to compare him to would be right after the 2010 elections when they brought in daly which signaled that they wanted to change their approach inside the white house, wanted to reach out to business, wanted to try to reach out to republicans, have better relationships with the house and senate. what this pick signals is that it's going to be a more combative white house, continue to be a pretty insular white house. i think some of the bellyaching speci internally, it's another white guy in leadership role inside the white house. it signals to me an approach where they're ready for combat. we see that in the legislation they're talking about for the next year that he wants to be pushing. and that also just the reality that the next two years are not going to be a pleasant two years for relationships between the white house and congress. nobody's expecting a grand bargain anymore. i think the chance -- they had a good chance to have one a couple months ago. they have almost no chance to get one now. the reality is it's going to be grind it out for the next couple years. he has
dynamics on the hill. a republican house that was elected within their districts by large margins and president who won an election. how do we bridge the gap? how do we actually get the deal done. >> we have a system that is incremental in nature. we're not a parliamentary system where, if you control the government, you can move very quickly and aggressively. i have always said that the american politics is played on the 40-yard line. and both sides feel very strongly about their philosophical position. but there is a deep identity of interest that i think needs -- leads to premature should lead to agreement. if you're the president of united states, there are two events that you know may occur in the next four years, which could totally derail your capacity to do the of the things you want to do about the nation, your positive agenda. the first is the terrorist and weapons of mass destruction. i think this president has been dedicated to intelligence gathering and his use of various capabilities to reduce that threat. and secondly, the issue of the financial crisis driven by the
. that is the message the president is taking to the public right now and with the recent election results behind him he is hoping to get republicans to bow and get out of the way of that in terms of trying to hold up a debt limit and let the economy take off. republicans are trying to figure out how do we get leverage to change the level of spending long term in the country? that is where the two sides are at odds in a very difficult way. >> right. finally a lot of chatter this morning about the portrait of the president always sort of encapsulates a moment in time. people either commenting on the degree to which he's gotten gray which happens to a lot of chief executives, but also some say, john, looking satisfied with a win in the last election. what is your take? >> i totally agree with that. he is grayer than he was but just as confident, some would say cocky and the picture captures that. this is a president who a lot of people thought because of the state of the economy wasn't going to win re-election. he did. he faced down the republican campaign and won it and now he is saying, hey. i'm on top
with the congress and then in 2012 what he felt was vindication in the election, how that changes his approach to dealing with congress and dealing with the country. it's going to be interesting to see how successful he can be. >> yeah. yep, yep. we'll see. you know, i don't -- you just don't want to push an agenda too far if it was still a pretty close election, john. we'll see. but i don't feel like -- >> well, it was. >> i don't feel like a whole lot of unity was headed our way. this is like throwing down the gauntlet and -- >> i agree with you. he was. and one of the dangers for presidents is that they get a little too confident, a little too cocky. we'll see whether he is reaching a little bit further than he can grasp. now, i willsy that what house republicans did last week on the debt limit was a promising sign for him in the sense that -- and i think he took it that way, which is that they -- at his insistence, he came out after the election and said i'm not going to play that game on the debt limit. in the end, they have broken the link between spending cuts and -- at least in the sho
tour of duty. he is returning to england later this week. we electing benjamin netanyahu for another term. the party cookbook to have fewer seats in parliament after those voting results are out tomorrow morning. netanyahu says this property is dealing with taiwan's nuclear ambitions. connell: the nation's graduation rate hitting the highest level. that is better than 75% of them doing it on time. during 1976 topped that of the three plus billion graduates. 78% finished on time this time around. those are stats that are getting better. a controversy brewing of north after canada's new $20 bank note came out. the crisis is over at the maple leaf. many people believe it represents a norwegian maple leaf. they call it the looney, maybe for good reason. if you have not had your flu shot yet, you may not have to worry after all. there is a tiny ice cream maker that has created a flavor of sorbet that soothes your sore throat with it. this is pretty good book stuff here. dagen: just find be the bourbon. dennis: eight dollars for a pint of this stuff. that is what it looks like. dagen: i do
to die in the american desert. the suffering must end. we look forward to working with our elected officials and all of good will toward this end. granted. -- thank you. >> as you can see by this range of perspective, the differences are not great but the unity is clear. the congress must take advantage of the opportunity to pass broad immigration reform. i would like to take questions from the press. please introduce yourself, your name as well as your outlook. >> i would like to hear more about the republican super pac. jeb bush, would they be a part of that? >> at this point -- the, we are getting all the paperwork and -- together and we should be ready to go soon. obviously the role of the super pac is to raise money that we can use to support immigration in districts where a republican is supportive. we cannot give the money to a candid it or say vote for this man or this woman. but we can support the concept in those critical districts. you will have to ask governor bush what his plans are and what he is doing. i would assume that anything related to immigration will catch hi
states's role in overthrowing the democratically elected leader in iran in the early 1950s is still hotly debated, the significance of that. that history is reviewed aerv o the scenes of a new movie that just iewened which is actually quite good. what do you think as you look of time, the lasting implications of u.s. policy deof >> iran is very complicated which we all understand. the ku of the prime minister was ousted if that is the word in 53 and the shop was never out of office but was reinstalled and put back in power. it was originally thought of by the british because it turned all the avy into oil. but i do think the present situation, you can understand or one should understand little bit that the iranian country has been overrun all its life by alexander, it has been told what to do by the greeks, the russians, united states, the british, they want to have a place at the table and they would like to have a say in their own lives. they live in a community surrounded by arabs. they have never gotten along despite the fact they're all muslims, the iranians don't like the muslims --
.(sot pal)15 25the key hhre issnnt to rehash what happened four years ago or the election that jjst passed. or the thingg that the president did or did not do . why can't we findd common ground sittdoon and when is it goinggto happenn you have to talk to the &pppesiient about thht. not the answer i was looking for.not the answer he was looking for either..nd now he nntion watches to see if the president who inspired so much fact, turn hope, into .can inn ccange.... ... ii his second onn polllter says that like his first.... and more like theesecond inauuuration of george w. bush. bush.innfact,... the... 50 percent... who matches ... the percentage of ameeicans... excitedd../// just... before... presidenn ábush'sá second term. 3 the response this ommn gave hee overrin a scooter....in 10 minutes on ffx45 news at ten and i'' paul gessler at the i'll tll you what to expect . high- profile phylicia barnes &pmurder case. 3 [ male announcer #1 ] verizon fios is the fastest internet in america. just ask pc mag. [ male announcer #2 ] cable can't touch fios upload speeds. it's hard to imagine
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